Surgeons and Nurse Hands Huring Surgery 2 (Stock Footage)

Surgeons and Nurse Hands Huring Surgery 2 (Stock Footage)

Surgeons and Nurse Doing Surgery. Operating theatres had a raised table or chair of some sort at the center for performing operations, and were surrounded by several rows of seats (operating theatres could be cramped or spacious) so students and other spectators could observe the case in progress. The surgeons wore street clothes with an apron to protect them from blood stains, and they operated bare-handed with unsterilized instruments and supplies In contrast to today’s concept of surgery as a profession that emphasizes cleanliness and conscientiousness, at the beginning of the 20th century the mark of a busy and successful surgeon was the profusion of blood and fluids on his clothes Surgeon implemented a comprehensive set of restrictions to ensure sterilization and aseptic operating conditions through the use of gowns, caps, and shoe covers, all of which were cleansed in his newly invented autoclave. Arms and faces of staff were washed with mercuric chloride, instruments were made with flat surfaces and the shelving was easy-to-clean glass. Neuber also introduced separate operating theaters for infected and uninfected patients and the use of heated and filtered air in the theater to eliminate

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