Blacksmith Hammer Hot Iron (Stock Footage)

Blacksmith Hammer Hot Iron (Stock Footage)

A blacksmith works with a hammer the heated iron bar, for modelling into a door hinge. However, cast iron and cheaper steel caused a gradual decline in wrought iron manufacture, with the last wrought ironworks in Britain closing in 1974. It is also used to make home decor items such as baker’s racks, wine racks, pot racks, etageres, table bases, desks, gates, beds, candle holders, curtain rods, bars and bar stools. The vast majority of wrought iron available today is from reclaimed materials. Old bridges and anchor chains dredged from harbors are major sources. The greater corrosion resistance of wrought iron is due to the siliceous impurities, namely ferric silicate. Because of limited availability, the use of wrought iron today is usually reserved for special applications, such as fine carpentry tools and historical restoration for objects of great importance

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